Journey to the Common Good



Respected Author And Theologian Walter Brueggemann Turns His Discerning Eye To The Most Critical Yet Basic Needs Of A World Adapting To A New Era, An Era Defined In Large Part By America S Efforts To Rebuild From An Age Of Terror Even As It Navigates Its Way Through An Economic Collapse Yet In Spite Of These Great Challenges, Brueggemann Calls Us To Journey Together To The Common Good Through Neighborliness, Covenanting, And Reconstruction Such A Concept May Seem Overwhelming, But Writing With His Usual Theological Acumen And Social Awareness Brueggemann Distills This Challenge To Its Most Basic Issues Where Is The Church Going What Is Its Role In Contemporary Society What Lessons Does It Have To Offer A World Enmeshed In Such Turbulent Times The Answer Is The Same Answer God Gave To The Israelites Thousands Of Years Ago Love Your Neighbor And Work For The Common Good Brueggemann Considers Biblical Texts As Examples Of The Journey Now Required Of The Faithful If They Wish To Move From Isolation And Distrust To A Practice Of Neighborliness, As An Invitation To A Radical Choice For Life Or For Death, And As A Reliable Script For Overcoming Contemporary Problems Of Loss And Restoration In A Failed Urban EconomyJourney to the Common Good

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[PDF] ✑ Journey to the Common Good  Author Walter Brueggemann – Mauritiusholidayvillas.co.uk
  • Paperback
  • 120 pages
  • Journey to the Common Good
  • Walter Brueggemann
  • English
  • 27 January 2018
  • 0664235166

10 thoughts on “Journey to the Common Good

  1. says:

    While many though not nearly enough people know that the reality of justice for those who are poor and oppressed is at the heart of the biblical narratives, very few are able to present it so lucidly and so passionately, with specific correlations to today s social situation than Walter Brueggemann A Scripture scholar who can also preach and teach dynamically, Brueggemann s insights into the Exodus story and the Gospel narratives about God offering graced abundance in the midst of gripping op While many though not nearly enough people know that the reality of justice for those who are poor and oppressed is at the heart of the biblical narratives, very few are able to present it so lucidly and so passionately, with specific correlations to today s social situation than Walter Brueggemann A Scripture scholar who can also preach and teach dynamically, Brueggemann s insights into the Exodus story and the Gospel narratives about God offering graced abundance in the midst of gripping oppression for the purpose of giving people strength and energy to turn toward the common good is a masterful commentary for a society addicted to rapacious use of the earth s resources and a seeming state of perpetual warfare The key point God continually offers an alternative way of living and being in the world that is focused on the true common good and though the road to get there is a difficult one, God has provided both the perspective and the examples for us to find our way by understanding the Scriptural narratives, not as pious platitudes but as the construction of a way of thinking for life to the world

  2. says:

    We had a pulpit guest this past year who leaned rather heavily on the work of Walter Brueggemann in his sermon By total coincidence I was involved in the service, including leading the meditation prayer element, and I had adapted one of Brueggemann s pieces from his Prayers for a Privileged People for the prayer During the polylogue after the service, the pulpit guest recommended this book to the congregation I believe several people bought it, I don t know how many actually read it It s far We had a pulpit guest this past year who leaned rather heavily on the work of Walter Brueggemann in his sermon By total coincidence I was involved in the service, including leading the meditation prayer element, and I had adapted one of Brueggemann s pieces from his Prayers for a Privileged People for the prayer During the polylogue after the service, the pulpit guest recommended this book to the congregation I believe several people bought it, I don t know how many actually read it It s farBiblically centered than many UUs at least in my congregation are accustomed to handling However, I enjoyed Brueggemann s use of Hebrew texts to illustrate the reality of Empire vis a vis Israel and the analogue to our current sociopolitical reality in the USA Exodus, Jeremiah, and Isaiah are his primary texts, revisioned as resources for the faithful to make a radical choice to understand our losses and envision restoration Very good

  3. says:

    Brueggemann, my Theologian du Jour, uses Old Testament scriptures as a scathing indictment on our current bourgeois systems of individualism and acquisitiveness The United States is as Pharoah s Egypt and Solomon s Jerusalem an ideologically driven system of scarcity, security, and wealth acquisition The Prophets offer an alternative to this lie one of God s abundance, and our call to neighborliness and community Thus Brueggemann reads Old Testament scripture as fresh, contemporary, and n Brueggemann, my Theologian du Jour, uses Old Testament scriptures as a scathing indictment on our current bourgeois systems of individualism and acquisitiveness The United States is as Pharoah s Egypt and Solomon s Jerusalem an ideologically driven system of scarcity, security, and wealth acquisition The Prophets offer an alternative to this lie one of God s abundance, and our call to neighborliness and community Thus Brueggemann reads Old Testament scripture as fresh, contemporary, and necessary in a society of credit collapse, terror, outrageous financial bonuses, and health care debate

  4. says:

    Brueggemann describes the kingdom of Babylon as a place of misplaced anxiety, fear of scarcity, exploitation, oppression of the weak God invites us into a very different kingdom, of welcome, abundance, extravagant generosity Brueggemann insists that God s people are called to live as a minority voice of subversion and alternative, standing firm for the values of his kingdom, and demonstrating these qualities hesed steadfast covenantal solidarity mispat justice that gives access and v Brueggemann describes the kingdom of Babylon as a place of misplaced anxiety, fear of scarcity, exploitation, oppression of the weak God invites us into a very different kingdom, of welcome, abundance, extravagant generosity Brueggemann insists that God s people are called to live as a minority voice of subversion and alternative, standing firm for the values of his kingdom, and demonstrating these qualities hesed steadfast covenantal solidarity mispat justice that gives access and viability to the weak andsedaqah righteousness as intervention for social well being It s a timely, convincing, and convicting message

  5. says:

    Every person of faith in the United States should read this book Heck, everyone in the world should read it What a wonderful world we would live in if we truly sought the common good This is a particularly powerful book at this time of crisis in the US with important elections looming.

  6. says:

    Wow I loved this read by Brueggemann the scriptural basis for the common good in the OT was helpful and the lens through which he reads the Exodus story was beautiful I am extremely thankful for this book, and I feel like I might be coming back to it again and again Highly recommended.

  7. says:

    Too much social justice based on a Social gospel Not enough Real Truth I have been disappointed with Brueggemann.

  8. says:

    An interesting idea posited by a great Old Testament mind Originally presented as a three part lecture, this book feels like an idea unvetted by editors, at points, the author identifies it as imaginative extrapolation return return Brueggemann sees two competing narrative in Jewish scripture, that of empire Pharaoh and Babylon and that of the common good Deuteronomy and the prophets Brueggemann sees Pharaoh s paradigms of wealth, might, and wisdom think national intelligence as pas An interesting idea posited by a great Old Testament mind Originally presented as a three part lecture, this book feels like an idea unvetted by editors, at points, the author identifies it as imaginative extrapolation return return Brueggemann sees two competing narrative in Jewish scripture, that of empire Pharaoh and Babylon and that of the common good Deuteronomy and the prophets Brueggemann sees Pharaoh s paradigms of wealth, might, and wisdom think national intelligence as passed on even to some heroes within the biblical narrative, most notably Solomon whose power rested not on a neighborly common good but on wealth, might, wisdom and an enshrined priesthood who helped those in power retain their position He sees within the biblical tradition an opposing thread promoting neighborliness characterized by grace, justice, and righteousness, calling true evangelical witness into the work Sabbath adherence and other godly practices that are antithetical to enshrined empires His interpretative ideas frameworks for Jeremiah and Isaiah are particularly interesting even if you don t buy into the logic of the book His ability to see the Gospel in the Old Testament while meeting its authors on their own very Jewish terms, is particularly helpful return return As a whole, Brueggemann s idea isn t totally without merit, but it s clear that it isn t a fully formulated idea in this format Each major section of the book has much content worthy of careful consideration, even if the logic connecting one section to the next doesn t feel fully formed Even so, the book is an interesting read and a good exercise of discernment of biblical truths

  9. says:

    One of my absolute favorites by Walter Brueggemann, and one of the best books I ve read all year I started it yesterday and basically couldn t put it down Beginning with the exodus, Brueggemann moves through the liberation from slavery and what he calls the empire of anxiety, meditating on the broad sweep of the oracles of Jeremiah and Isaiah to round them out Brueggemann uses his characteristically deft exegetical insights to tease out the meaning of the empire of anxiety, the grind of l One of my absolute favorites by Walter Brueggemann, and one of the best books I ve read all year I started it yesterday and basically couldn t put it down Beginning with the exodus, Brueggemann moves through the liberation from slavery and what he calls the empire of anxiety, meditating on the broad sweep of the oracles of Jeremiah and Isaiah to round them out Brueggemann uses his characteristically deft exegetical insights to tease out the meaning of the empire of anxiety, the grind of labor, the worry for production, the state monopoly on the people s means of production or what economists call primitive accumulation, the acquisition and commodification of the natural world and the public commons by state or private interests, and contrasts this with the alternative community which God led the Israelite slaves into, a world of enough, of peace, contentment, and cooperation The book follows this compelling thread through the kingship period of Solomon and the prophetic periods of Jeremiah and Isaiah in beautiful and illuminating fashion, and then points us toward the Kingdom of God as the final alternative community in which we are called to liberation from the empire of anxiety Highly, HIGHLY, recommended

  10. says:

    Seeking the common good is something that most Christians, at least in theory, consider integral to the faith But what does it actually look like Where do we find inspiration or instruction for the journey And where will the journey take us These are the questions Walter Brueggemann explores in Journey to the Common Good Westminster John Knox As a world renowned Old Testament scholar, he sets out to locate the answers in three places Exodus, which sheds light on the journey from anxiety t Seeking the common good is something that most Christians, at least in theory, consider integral to the faith But what does it actually look like Where do we find inspiration or instruction for the journey And where will the journey take us These are the questions Walter Brueggemann explores in Journey to the Common Good Westminster John Knox As a world renowned Old Testament scholar, he sets out to locate the answers in three places Exodus, which sheds light on the journey from anxiety to neighborliness Jeremiah, an invitation to choose life over death and Isaiah, which helps us move from loss to restoration.I won t attempt to do justice to his arguments here, but each of the three is an important way of understanding the journey to the common good Seeat

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